Atkinson-Baker Provides Legal Videographers

Court reporting firm Atkinson-Baker Court Reporters (http://www.depo.com/) is currently offering legal videographers as an aspect of their deposition services.

The Atkinson-Baker team provides legal videographers to assist in trial preparedness and during a trial. A video deposition highlights a witness’s demeanor and behavior, which proves useful during a trial, as the subtleties can be lost on a jury when reading a deposition transcript should the witness not be available to testify.  Additionally, during the final stages of trial planning, reviewing video depositions can help attorneys plan their cross-examination strategy.

At Atkinson-Baker, the standard legal videographer package includes: One set of master tapes for archive and duplication; mics on deponent, taking attorney and opposing counsel; additional lighting; backdrops to meet code requirements; notarized affidavit for tapes; and being on site in advance of scheduled start time. Each videotape is synchronized with the reporter’s transcript and is captured on a CD, which includes software that allows the user to review the video, create clips, and export them to presentation programs.

A client of Atkinson-Baker states, “Your firm is dependable. We have had you cover complicated assignments with multiple court reporters and conference rooms with many changes, and it was smoothly handled.”

Atkinson-Baker’s headquarters are located in Glendale, CA, with 17 branch offices around the country.  Ms. Sheila Atkinson-Baker has been a professional court reporter for over 35 years, five of which she served as a court reporter in the federal district court.  In 1992 and 1993, the company made the prestigious Inc. 500 list of the 500 fastest-growing companies in the US. They have also been listed four times in the annual Inc. 5,000 list of the fastest-growing, privately held companies in the United States.

You can visit the company’s main website at http://www.depo.com, their blog can be seen at http://depositionreporters.com, and a few of their branch websites include http://atkinsonbakersanfrancisco.com, http://courtreporterssandiego.com, and http://courtreporter-chicago.com. They can be reached at 800-288-3376.

Atkinson-Baker Now Providing Electronic Exhibits for Depositions

Atkinson-Baker Court Reporters (https://www.depo.com/), a court reporting firm, is currently offering electronic exhibits for depositions. This service allows for easier handling of exhibits, particularly for web conferencing and remote deposition services.

The electronic exhibit service utilizes computer applications to eliminate the need for hard copy documents. With the use of this technology, only a laptop or tablet need be transported, instead of boxes of paper. Documents can be uploaded beforehand, and the court reporter provides a device on which the witness views the documents. The questioning attorney controls when documents will appear for the witness to view. Once it is determined to mark an exhibit, an electronic exhibit stamp can be placed on the document.

Ms. Sheila Atkinson-Baker, president of Atkinson-Baker, stated, “Our team who oversees web conference and videoconference depositions has seen firsthand how valuable electronic exhibits can be and how they simplify the deposition process. The majority of documents that today’s attorneys receive and work with are already electronic in format. Quite frequently, these electronic documents are printed and distributed in hard copy format. Upon deposition completion, the paper exhibits are collected and scanned back into electronic format. This is a roundabout way of handling exhibits and an immense amount of extra work in a case with hundreds of documents. Additionally, personnel inefficiency, paper and ink costs and shipping translate into unneeded expense. Use of this technology circumvents this extra work and expense.”

Atkinson-Baker’s headquarters are located in Glendale, CA, with 17 branch offices around the country. Ms. Sheila Atkinson-Baker has been a professional court reporter for over 35 years, five of which she served as a court reporter in the federal district court. In 1992 and 1993, the company made the prestigious Inc. 500 list of the 500 fastest growing companies in the US. They have also been listed four times in the annual Inc. 5,000 list of the fastest-growing privately held companies in the United States.

You can visit the company’s main website at https://www.depo.com/.  Their blog can be seen at http://www.depositionreporters.com/, and a few of their branch websites include http://www.atkinsonbakerhouston.com, http://www.atkinsonbakerphiladelphia.com, and http://atkinsonbakerorangecounty.com. They can be reached at 800-288-3376.

Atkinson-Baker Provides Court Reporters Outside of the US

Atkinson-Baker Court Reporters (http://www.depo.com/), is announcing their global court reporting services. This service makes court reporters available in any country where depositions are legally allowed.

The team at Atkinson-Baker Court Reporters provides their clients with court reporters in different countries on a regular basis. As an example, they recently had a Los Angeles attorney who needed to take a deposition of a witness in Melbourne, Australia. Atkinson-Baker Court Reporters provided a court reporter in Australia, while the client deposed the witness via web conferencing. By utilizing this service, attorneys are able to keep their costs down and reduce travel time.

A client from Fontana, CA, stated, “Your agency is absolutely fabulous to work with! Everyone I’ve ever dealt with has been right on top of their game and never fail to answer a question or return a call. You should be proud of your staff. You’re a huge organization, but you really do give a personal touch to everything and treat your reporters very well. I hope to meet you in person some day.”

Atkinson-Baker’s headquarters are located in Glendale, CA, with 17 branch offices around the country.  Ms. Sheila Atkinson-Baker has been a professional court reporter for over 35 years, five of which she served as a court reporter in the federal district court.  In 1992 and 1993, the company made the prestigious Inc. 500 list of the 500 fastest-growing companies in the US. They have also been listed four times in the annual Inc. 5,000 list of the fastest-growing privately held companies in the United States.

You can visit the company’s main website at http://www.depo.com.  Their blog can be seen at http://www.depositionreporters.com.  A few of their branch websites include http://courtreporter-newyork.com/, http://courtreporterphiladelphia.com/, and http://atkinsonbakerhouston.com/.  They can be reached at 800-288-3376.

Atkinson-Baker is Celebrating 30 Years as a Leader in Court Reporting Services

Atkinson-Baker Court Reporters (http://www.depo.com/), a court reporting firm, is celebrating their 30th year as a leading provider of court reporting services. They offer additional services such as case management, customized corporate programs, legal video and interpreters, and more.

After Ms. Sheila Atkinson-Baker, Atkinson-Baker President, graduated from her local community college’s court reporting program, she worked as a professional court reporter for over a decade. After working in courts in Florida, Wisconsin, and California, and gaining experience as a freelance court reporter, Ms. Atkinson-Baker realized there were more court reporting jobs in Los Angeles than there were court reporters who were available in the market. She and her husband saw this as an opportunity to create Atkinson-Baker in order to help match clients with the right court reporter for the job.

Within the first year of operation, Atkinson-Baker was a success. Atkinson-Baker President Ms. Sheila Atkinson-Baker stated, “From Atkinson-Baker’s first day, company executives and staff have operated the business with a singular purpose: to provide clients with the very best court reporting services. Staying true to these principles has helped Atkinson-Baker transform from a family-owned, two-person team to a thriving business of more than 170 employees and 1,000-plus court reporters today.”

Atkinson-Baker’s headquarters are located in Glendale, CA, with 17 branch offices around the country.  Ms. Sheila Atkinson-Baker has been a professional court reporter for over 35 years, five of which she served as a court reporter in the federal district court.  In 1992 and 1993, the company made the prestigious Inc. 500 list of the 500 fastest growing companies in the US. They have also been listed four times in the annual Inc. 5,000 list of the fastest-growing privately held companies in the United States.

You can visit the company’s main website at http://www.depo.com, their blog can be seen at http://www.atkinsonbaker.com, and a few of their branch websites include http://www.atkinsonbakermiami.com, http://www.atkinsonbakernewyork.com, and http://atkinsonbakerchicago.com. They can be reached at 800-288-3376.

Atkinson-Baker is Offering Web Conferencing for Depositions

Atkinson-Baker Court Reporters (http://www.depo.com/), a court reporting firm, is informing the public on a service they are currently offering: web conferencing for depositions. This service allows lawyers to conduct depositions from the comfort of their office, reducing travel time and expenses.

Web conferencing makes it possible for a court reporter to be sent to a location with a laptop. The court reporter will set up a web conferencing connection via Skype, GoToMeeting, or WebEx, and the witness is located at the same location as the court reporter, allowing the attorney to remain at their office while conducting the deposition. The flexibility of location lets lawyers conduct a deposition from the convenience of a laptop, desktop, or a mobile device.

There are a number of features available to law firms that choose web conferencing. These features include:

  • Law firm efficiency can improve due to time that is saved
  • Significant cost savings on travel and equipment
  • Great ease of use; special equipment is not required
  • Allows small law firms to conduct web conferences without a room-based video system

Atkinson-Baker President Ms. Sheila Atkinson-Baker stated, “While web conferencing is not brand new, it is only starting to become more known and used by law firms. We set up the meeting room, the web conferencing, the reporter, and the documents. This helps with convenience and saves travel expenses, as well as saving the expense of a videoconferencing set-up. We also have staff employees whose job it is to work with and train clients who are interested in this service and to help with any needed troubleshooting on the day of the deposition.”

Atkinson-Baker has a staff of over 170 and a court reporter base of over 1,200. The company’s headquarters are located in Glendale, CA, with 17 branch offices around the country.  Ms. Sheila Atkinson-Baker, the president of the company, has been a professional court reporter for over 35 years, five of which she served as a court reporter in the federal district court.  In 1992 and 1993, the company made the prestigious Inc. 500 list of the 500 fastest growing companies in the US. They have also been listed four times in the annual Inc. 5,000 list of the fastest-growing privately held companies in the United States.

You can visit the company’s main website at http://www.depo.com.  Their blog can be seen at http://www.depositionreporters.com, and a few of their branch websites include http://www.atkinsonbakermiami.com, http://www.atkinsonbakernewyork.com, and http://atkinsonbakerchicago.com. They can be reached at 800-288-3376.

Atkinson-Baker Court Reporters Announced as Sponsor for the 2017 CLM Annual Conference

The Claims and Litigation Management Alliance (CLM) is pleased to announce Atkinson-Baker Court Reporters (http://depo.com) as sponsor for the 2017 CLM Annual Conference. CLM will host 2,000 claims professionals and outside counsel in Nashville on March 29-31, 2017, during the largest insurance claims conference in the country. In addition to the plentiful networking opportunities, there will be three days of powerful programs tailored to the contemporary needs of claims and litigation management professionals and defense attorneys serving the insurance industry.

Atkinson-Baker President Ms. Sheila Atkinson-Baker stated, “We are pleased to be a sponsor for the upcoming 2017 CLM Annual Conference in Nashville. We feel our court reporting services are a great fit with litigation management professionals serving the insurance industry.”

Atkinson-Baker has a staff of over 170 and a court reporter base of over 1,200. The company’s headquarters are in Glendale, CA, with 17 branch offices around the country. The president of the company, Ms. Sheila Atkinson-Baker, has been a professional court reporter for over 35 years, five of which she served as a court reporter in the federal district court. She is a Registered Professional Reporter and has served on the Board of Directors of the California Court Reporters Association. The company tackles depositions throughout the US and in many other countries when the need arises. In fact, every hour of the business week they are doing an average of 18 depositions somewhere in the world. In 1992 and in 1993 the company made the prestigious Inc. 500 list as one of the 500 fastest growing companies in the US. They have also been listed four times in the annual Inc. 5,000 list of the fastest-growing privately held companies in the United States.

The company’s main website is http://depo.com, their blog can be seen at http://atkinsonbaker.com, and some of their branch websites include http://atkinsonbakerhouston.com, http://atkinsonbakerphiladelphia.com,  and http://atkinsonbakersandiego.com. They can be reached at 800-288-3376.

Atkinson-Baker Court Reporters Becomes HIPAA Compliant

LOS ANGELES, CA: Atkinson-Baker, Inc., Court Reporters (http://depo.com) recently became HIPAA privacy and security compliant. Under HIPAA privacy rules, Atkinson-Baker, Inc., is considered a Business Associate, and they are compliant with all applicable rules and regulations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996.

Atkinson-Baker handles and archives transcripts of legal hearings and depositions, and often some of the related documents to the transcripts are PHI-protected (Protected Health Information) documents. The documents can also include financial information of different companies, as well as other trade secrets information.

The process of becoming HIPAA compliant involved a number of steps, including:

  • All Atkinson-Baker employees have been trained on HIPAA rules and procedures and are required to re-take this training every 2 years.
  • All employees are required to sign a confidentiality agreement as a condition of employment.
  • All policies and procedures related to information and physical security are frequently reviewed to ensure they are up to date and follow any new or revised regulation.
  • The company implemented a number of upgraded Information Security procedures.

Atkinson-Baker President Ms. Sheila Atkinson-Baker stated, “We are committed to keeping all PHI (Protected Health Information) and sensitive information secure, and to keeping our systems and procedures up to date and in compliance with all related regulations.  We know that keeping our client’s information safe is of the utmost importance, and we take this very seriously when processing client transcripts, copying exhibits, or any other of the myriad of ways we come across this information while doing our job. Our company makes one promise to the legal world: one call to us and we’ll do the rest. We get the job done with a comprehensive dedication to meeting our client’s demands at any time and in any location, across town or across the country. And always at competitive local rates.”

Atkinson-Baker has a staff of over 170 and a court reporter base of over 1,200. The company’s headquarters are in Glendale, CA, with 17 branch offices around the country. The president of the company, Ms. Sheila Atkinson-Baker, has been a professional court reporter for over 35 years, five of which she served as a court reporter in the federal district court. She is a Registered Professional Reporter and has served on the Board of Directors of the California Court Reporters Association. The company tackles depositions throughout the US and in many other countries when the need arises. In fact, every hour of the business week they are doing an average of 18 depositions somewhere in the world. In 1992 and in 1993 the company made the prestigious Inc. 500 list as one of the 500 fastest growing companies in the US. They have also been listed four times in the annual Inc. 5,000 list of the fastest-growing privately held companies in the United States.

The company’s main website is http://depo.com, their blog can be seen at http://atkinsonbaker.com, and some of their branch websites include http://atkinsonbakermiami.com, http://atkinsonbakernewyork.com, and http://atkinsonbakerchicago.com. They can be reached at 800-288-3376.

Where’s your evidence? DNA, fingerprints and expert witnesses

Evidence collection has evolved significantly over the years. During the early 1900s, for instance, fingerprinting was a new technology that allowed law enforcement investigators to link individuals to crime scenes and provided them with real physical evidence that could be used in court to gain a conviction. DNA profiling is much more recent and was first introduced in 1984 by Dr. Alec Jeffreys, an English researcher studying the patterns found in various human DNA strands. For both types of evidence, enlisting the help of a qualified expert witness to explain the results can provide added help for attorneys in presenting their cases effectively.

Fingerprinting and classifications

In 1880, Henry Faulds first made the case that fingerprints could be used to identify suspects in criminal cases. This theory was published in Nature, a major scientific journal of the time. Faulds’ theory went unremarked for many years and was eventually appropriated by Francis Galton, a cousin of Charles Darwin and an unashamed plagiarist who based his own forensic theories on Faulds’ work without ever giving proper credit to his source. Galton developed a system by which fingerprints could be classified and distinguished. This method was soon superseded by more intuitive systems that were adopted by Scotland Yard and other law enforcement agencies sometime in the early part of the 20th century.

DNA and the RFLP test

Although James Watson and Francis Crick are often credited with the discovery of deoxyribonucleic acid, better known as DNA, the real honor should be given to Dr. Friedrich Miescher of Switzerland. Dr. Miescher isolated DNA from wound dressings; Watson and Crick were primarily responsible for identifying the double helix, a double-stranded DNA molecule. There is no such controversy, however, regarding the innovator who made DNA testing possible. Dr. Alec Jeffreys developed a test that could distinguish individuals from each other based solely on their DNA patterns. The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) test required a large sample of DNA from each individual for comparison purposes, making it relatively impractical for use in criminal investigations.

Polymerase chain reaction testing

Although polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests had been around since 1984, it was not until the latter part of the decade that these processes were applied to DNA. PCR testing offered significant advantages over RFLP in practical use:

  • PCR tests can identify matching patterns using much shorter strands. This allows the evaluation of older DNA samples that may have been degraded or have broken down over time.
  • Less material is required to make a valid comparison using the PCR testing method.

Forensic scientists can provide valuable testimony and evidence regarding the likelihood that a particular individual was at the scene of a crime or that they committed incriminating acts.

Today, mitochondrial-based testing offers even greater pinpoint accuracy in determining whether two sets of DNA match up. For attorneys, obtaining testimony from expert witnesses with experience in fingerprint and DNA evidence can offer added support for a particular version of events. Remote depositions from acknowledged experts in these fields can be of benefit to both the prosecution and the defense in presenting their cases to judges and jurors in the courtroom setting.

 

How 3-D printing can assist in presenting evidence

Advances in 3-D printing techniques have made a splash in the business and academic environments and have been used to create custom parts and models in a wide range of industries. The items produced by 3-D printers have been used to reconstruct fossils, to create prosthetics for patients, to fabricate educational materials, and to produce an impressive list of consumer products. The use of these devices in the legal field, however, has been somewhat limited. Understanding how 3-D printing works can help your legal firm make the most of these new technologies in presenting evidence effectively.

The basics of 3-D printing

Also known as additive printing, 3-D printing techniques create custom objects by building them one layer at a time according to the specifications entered by the computer operator. This contrasts with most other methods of fabrication, which typically involve shaping of or subtraction from materials to create the finished item. Top-end 3-D printers offer exceptional accuracy and precision to allow the production of extremely small parts for industrial or medical use. The precise results provided by 3-D printing techniques have also been used to recreate forensic evidence to assist law enforcement officials in investigating crimes.

3-D in the courtroom setting

Some companies are now offering 3-D services to legal practices to assist in the presentation of evidence in the courtroom setting. By creating models of critical exhibits, attorneys can clearly demonstrate various injuries and other critical elements of their cases:

  • Broken bones can be accurately reproduced from X-rays to demonstrate the severity of the impact sustained in an auto accident
  • Crime scenes can be reproduced at a smaller scale to reinforce a particular point or perspective
  • Fingerprints can be duplicated and enlarged to show points of comparison

Because 3-D printed items are not actual evidence, they can be safely handled and examined by jurors in the courtroom setting. This can allow a more hands-on approach to evidence presentation while ensuring that jurors have access to the most accurate information on which to base their decisions.

Integrating 3-D presentations into legal cases

In many cases, 3-D models are actually cheaper to produce than comparable computer animations. As 3-D printers and printing services continue to go down in price, the use of 3-D models in the courtroom is likely to increase. By establishing a relationship with a reliable 3-D reconstruction firm early on, legal firms can ensure access to these valuable evidence presentation tools and can make a positive impact on jurors. This can establish your firm as a leading resource for top quality representation and can ensure the best possible outcomes for your clients.

New technologies are revolutionizing the way legal firms like yours do business in the courtroom and in the office environment. Remote depositions, iPad projections, and 3-D models can help you to deliver the most effective arguments on behalf of your clients. By staying on the cutting edge of these advances, you can ensure that your presentations make the right impression on every member of the jury.

 

The value of tech training for your legal staff

Modern software platforms can streamline your legal processes and provide your staff with added collaboration tools. Proper training in these new technologies is essential to ensure the most effective deployment of cloud storage platforms, video conferencing services, remote depositions, and collaboration software suites in your workplace. By investing in training for your staff, you can reduce their learning curve and ensure the most positive results for your software implementations.

Different learning styles

Allowing for differences in how the members of your legal team learn new skills can take some of the stress out of the training process. Some staff members may learn best by doing; by allowing them to test out the new software on their own, these tech-savvy staffers may be able to master these technologies more quickly. Others may require visual aids like videos or flowcharts to make sense of the new software platform. In-depth documentation should be provided for all members of your legal team as a reference and guide to more complex processes and functions.

A relatively small investment in training can pay off in improved morale, increased productivity and greater employee engagement with the learning process. By putting new software tools to work in your office, you can enjoy the benefits of today’s technological age.

 

5 techy tips for managing security in the office

For many attorneys, the availability of new technologies has led to increased digitization and online storage of documents and data related to past and current cases. These advances can allow members of the legal team to access information remotely to allow anytime, anywhere editing and updating of critical information. Implementation of cloud computing strategies and centralized data storage requires added attention to security for sensitive client information. Here are five helpful tips for protecting legal data in the modern computing marketplace.

Engage your employees

An important first step in establishing best security practices for your legal practice is to bring your staff members on board with your new policies. Explaining in clear and simple language the steps required of your legal team and the reasons behind these security measures can increase staff buy-in and can ensure the most positive results for your practice. By presenting the same information in printed form, you can reduce the risk of errors by your valued legal team.

Prioritize your data

Not all data is created equal. Determining the most critical information and making arrangements to protect and back up this data can help you manage the next steps of your security implementation more effectively.

Create tiered levels of access

Maintaining certain information on a need-to-know basis can help your legal practice protect sensitive client information from unauthorized access or accidental disclosure. By creating tiers of access within your organization to provide added control over your data, you can reduce the risks to your clients and the potential legal liabilities for your law office.

Evaluate your cloud services provider

If you choose to store case information with a third-party cloud services provider, it is critically important to read the fine print regarding how your data will be protected in various scenarios, including the following:

  • What happens to your data if the cloud services provider is forced to shut down for financial or other reasons?
  • Who has access to your data at the remote location?
  • Will your data be stored alongside that of other clients or on a separate server?
  • How is your information protected against unauthorized access from outside and inside the provider offices?
  • Are redundancies and backups in place to ensure the integrity of your data even if a specific server is corrupted or fails altogether?

Ensuring continuous access to and protection for information stored in the cloud is essential for your overall data security plan.

Seek professional help

The intricacies of encryption can be challenging even for the most computer-savvy individuals. By working with a professional firm to manage and oversee your data security needs, you can often achieve better results and increased safety for sensitive client information.

These five steps can form the foundation of a solid security strategy for your practice and can ensure that you stay on the right side of confidentiality requirements and protection of your legal data.

 

How cloud storage can streamline required disclosures

Cloud storage solutions are becoming more and more prevalent in the business community. In the legal field, allowing secure login access to specific documents in the cloud can actually speed the delivery of relevant documents to opposing counsel and can ensure full compliance with all regulations pertaining to both the sharing of information and the securing of that same information against unauthorized access.

Tiered levels of access

Depositions are a good example of documentation that must typically be shared among all members of a legal team. Attorneys may also be required to share this information with their counterparts on the other side of the case. By creating tiered access to the specific documents and evidence that pertain to a particular court case, legal professionals can eliminate tedious copying duties and can reduce the effort involved in delivering these materials directly to the opposing counsel.

Along with the improvements to disclosure procedures, cloud storage solutions can allow improved collaboration among the members of your legal team. Modern software platforms allow tracking of all changes and edits to case documentation for greater accountability and accuracy. In this way, these advanced software suites can boost productivity during the critical lead-up to the big day in court.